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<< Command Status Reports | Command Usage Reports >>
<< Command Status Reports | Command Usage Reports >>

What's in Command Status Reports?

Types of Reports
355
What's in Command Usage Reports?
Command Usage reports contain a section on cumulative statistics and a section on
summary statistics.
Cumulative Statistics
s
Active Time
The sum of the active time of all virtual testers. The active time of a
virtual tester is the time that the virtual tester spent thinking (including delays
after the virtual tester's first recorded command), executing commands, and
waiting for responses.
s
Inactive Time
The sum of the inactive time of all virtual testers and test scripts.
The inactive time of a virtual tester is the time before the virtual tester's first
emulation command (including the overhead time needed to set up and initialize
the run), and possibly interscript delay (the time between the last emulation
command of the previous test script and the beginning of the current test script).
s
Passed Commands
The total number of passed send commands; that is,
commands that send virtual tester input to the server.
s
Failed Commands
The total number of failed send commands; that is, commands
that send virtual tester input to the server.
s
Passed Responses
The total number of responses to send commands that were
matched by passing receive commands. This is not the same as the total number of
expected receive commands, because a response may be matched by an arbitrary
number of receive commands. A response is considered expected if all receive
commands used to match it have an expected status.
s
Failed Responses
The total number of responses that were matched by failing
receive commands. This is not the same as the total number of unexpected receive
commands, because a response may be received by an arbitrary number of receive
commands. A response is considered unexpected if any receive commands used to
match it have an unexpected status.
Note:
The total of passed commands plus failed commands often does not equal
the total of passed responses plus failed responses. This is because send
commands and responses in a test script do not necessarily have a one-to-one
correspondence. For example, an HTTP script may issue one send command
(
http_request
) and receive multiple responses to the send
(
http_header_recv
and one or more
http_nrecv commands
).